We have strict accounting protocols in place that provide the highest level of security to your association funds. Learn more about fiscal responsibility at SCS.

Expected Upkeep Enforced By The Community Association Management Firm

Expected Upkeep Enforced by the Community Association Management Firm

The staff or volunteers you see occasionally walking around your community with clipboards or tablets, are the association’s covenants enforcement officers. They’re inspecting the property to ensure that everything is working properly, that conditions are safe and that nothing is reducing property values or your quality of life in your Carolina community.

In short, they’re making sure policies and rules are being followed—from pet behavior, parking and unkempt lawns to improper exterior modifications and more. They field complaints from fellow homeowners and, if necessary, remind you (or your neighbor) when a rule has been overlooked.

The officers report their findings to the Carolina Home Association board with photos and detailed notes. Most violations are easily resolved without board action. If not, the next step is a hearing before the board—we want to hear your side of the story. Those who continue to ignore rules may be fined, or worse. The most serious cases may end up in court, though we try very hard never to get to that point.

The association’s covenants enforcement officers perform a vital function; please treat them with courtesy and respect. If you have any questions about the rules, the officers should be able to explain them. The association manager and board members also are happy to listen and respond to your concerns.

When you purchased your home in our common-interest community in the Carolinas, you became contractually bound to abide by the covenants that protect the association. Please review them and ensure you are in compliance. You can find them on our website.

The Responsibility Of The HOA Board

The Responsibility of the HOA Board

Community associations are more than just a neighborhood. In many ways, it’s a lot like a business. Collectively, regular annual assessments amount to tens of thousands of dollars that need to be budgeted carefully and spent wisely. And neighbors who have volunteered and been elected to serve on the association’s board are responsible for making critical decisions—on the homeowner’s behalf—about managing the community and money.

An HOA board also develops long-range plans—like when the parking lot will need to be repaved and when the elevators will need to be replaced—about the parts of the community that are shared property. The board must set aside funds so that these kinds of projects can be accomplished on schedule or even ahead of schedule in the event there’s an unexpected breakdown.

The board also sends out requests for bids and contracts with vendors to do the work necessary to maintain our shared amenities. Board members decide who will do the best job of replacing the roof at the best price or who will be the most reliable company to hire to mow the grass and remove dead tree limbs.

The board’s decisions can have a significant impact on the community’s appearance and, consequently, on our property values. Regardless of our professional manager, the board ultimately is responsible for overseeing community association operations. Be sure to communicate with the board regularly, observe board meetings, and attend annual meetings to elect responsible board members and to participate in the conversations about significant community issues.

Board Education

Board Education

At Southern Community Services, we love an educated board. One great resource for training is the Board Leadership Development Workshop offered by the Community Associations Institute (CAI). This training teaches board members how to communicate with association residents, hire qualified managers and service providers, develop enforceable rules, interpret governing documents and more. It provides a comprehensive look at the roles and responsibilities of community association leaders and conveys information to help create and maintain the kind of community people want to call home.

Along with the lectures, you will receive ra complete toolbox of resources containing:

  • The Board Member Tool Kit
  • The Board Member Tool Kit Workbook
  • Community Association Leadership: A Guide for Volunteers
  • Managing & Governing: How Community Associations Function, by Clifford J. Treese
  • The Homeowner & the Community Association brochure
  • From Good to Great: Principles for Community Association Success brochure

Whether you live in a condominium, homeowners association (HOA) or other type of community, the Board Leadership Development Workshop highlights what every board member needs to know to serve effectively. The workshop consists of five modules:

  • Module 1: Governing Documents and Roles & Responsibilities. To start you on the right path, Module 1 helps you understand the legal authority for your association. It also clarifies the duties and responsibilities of each board member and the professionals who are available to assist the board.
  • Module 2: Communications, Meetings and Volunteerism. Module 2 helps you learn how to maximize volunteer involvement in your community association by improving board communications, conducting effective meetings and building community spirit.
  • Module 3: Fundamentals of Financial Management. Module 3 introduces the fundamentals of association financial management, including guidelines for protecting your association’s assets, preparing a budget, planning for the future and collecting assessments.
  • Module 4: Professional Advisors and Service Providers. Because putting together the right team to support your association can be challenging, Module 4 provides practical tips on finding, evaluating and hiring qualified professional advisors and service providers.
  • Module 5: Association Rules and Conflict Resolution. Module 5 explores guidelines for making reasonable association rules, enforcing rules fairly and resolving conflict effectively.

Consider the benefits of becoming an educated board member and signing up for the CAI training.

About Our Association Secretary

About Our Association Secretary

Community management boards have several officers including president, treasurer and secretary. The homeowners association secretary is responsible for preserving the homeowners association’s history, maintaining its records and protecting it from liability. In some instances, the secretary delegates some or all of the secretarial tasks to the manager. They include:

  • Recording minutes for all HOA meetings—board meetings, special meetings, annual meetings and committee meetings.
  • Announcing meetings and preparing agendas for board and members meetings as required by law.
  • Maintaining HOA records—keeping files organized, safe, accessible, categorized, identified and retained according to schedule.
  • Witnessing and verifying signatures on checks and other financial and legal documents.
  • Maintaining rosters of all association board and committee members, officers and members of the association, including their current mailing address.
  • Verifying proxies at annual or special membership meetings and ensuring that proxies and ballots are kept in the association’s records.
  • Filing forms with state agencies—employment forms, incorporation documents and other official records.
  • Managing correspondence to the manager, office, board members, committee chairs and others; ensuring that tone, form and spelling of all association correspondence reflect positively on the association.

The community association secretary is a key officer on the board and is essential to the association’s success.