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Expected Upkeep Enforced by our Community Association Management Firms

The staff or volunteers you occasionally see walking around your community with clipboards or tablets are your association’s covenant enforcement officers. They’re inspecting the property to ensure that everything is working properly, that conditions are safe and that nothing is reducing property values or the quality of life in your Carolina community.

In short, they’re making sure policies and rules are being followed—from pet behavior, parking and unkempt lawns, to improper exterior modifications and more. They field complaints from fellow homeowners and, if necessary, remind you (or your neighbor) when a rule has been overlooked.

The officers report their findings to the Carolina Home Association board with photos and detailed notes. Most violations are easily resolved without board action. If not, the next step is a hearing before the board—we want to hear your side of the story. Those who continue to ignore rules may be fined or taken to more extreme measures. The most serious cases may end up in court, though we try very hard to never get to that point.

Your association’s covenant enforcement officers perform a vital function, so please treat them with courtesy and respect. If you have any questions about the rules, the officers can explain them to you. Your association manager and board members are happy to listen and respond to any concerns.

When you purchased your home in one of our common-interest communities in the Carolinas, you became contractually bound to abide by the covenants that protect your association. Please review them and ensure that you are in compliance. You can find them on our website.

Sounds Like a Good Idea

Noise is a concern for every resident, and because you live in a community it’s important to understand that some degree of noise is to be expected. At the same time, residents need to consider the consequences of their noisy behavior. To keep everyone happy and maintain civility among neighbors, the homeowners association asks that you take a few steps to reduce or eliminate annoying noise.

Be kind and respectful. A little common courtesy makes a big difference. Keep your music and television at reasonable levels, do your vacuuming before bedtime and before remodeling, check with the community association manager about acceptable hours and days of the week that work can be done. If you put in hardwood or tile flooring, use a sound-reducing underlayment. Move noisy appliances away from walls and put sound-absorbing material underneath before it becomes an issue for your neighbors.

Keep a log. If you’re disturbed by a noise problem, note the times and the nature of the noise. Ask the community association manager to listen and verify the noise as well. There may be a pattern in the noise that can be adjusted.

Visit your neighbor. If your neighbor is the source of the noise, try a friendly chat. Sometimes people simply don’t realize their noise is affecting others. People are usually considerate once they realize they’re disturbing others. And, if your neighbor knocks on your door, listen politely and be willing to make changes to reduce your own noise levels.

Contact the manager. If a polite request doesn’t change your neighbor’s noisiness, it may be time to ask the community association manager for help.  Have your noise log ready, including attempts to solve the problem yourself.