New Hires Bring Vision To The Lake Keowee Community

New Hires Bring Vision to the Lake Keowee Community

Southern Community Services Welcomes New Employees to the Upstate

New hires bring vision to the Lake Keowee Community

Nov. 8, 2017 (Greenville, S.C.) – Southern Community Services (SCS), one of only six AAMC-accredited community association management firms in South Carolina, has hired four new employees in the Upstate of South Carolina: Justin Rogers, Jamie Ogles, John Summey and Jennifer Wilks. They will all work at the Lake Keowee community.

“All four new hires are incredibly talented and will bring great new vision to the Lake Keowee community,” says Ken Tamsin, CEO of SCS. “I’m looking forward to seeing their success in the Upstate.”

Justin Rogers, community association manager, has a background in insurance, heavy commercial and civil construction, and strategic community management and development.  His new role at SCS allows him to use his management experience to further enhance and manage the Lake Keowee Community.

Community association assistant manager Jamie Ogles is looking forward to working alongside Rogers, Summey and Wilks. Ogles brings over 34 years of secretarial experience to Lake Keowee, as well as previous experience as a regional manager.

SCS named John Summey architectural review committee (ARC) administrator for the Lake Keowee community. His experience in forestry, construction and commercial building maintenance will carry over to aid his new role.

Jennifer Wilks, community association administrative assistant, has over 10 years of office management and administrative experience. She was the previous owner of Executive Courier & Errand Services, LLC and office manager at Clemson Sports Medicine.

Lake Keowee, a lakefront community in Sunset, S.C., has acres of wildlife conservancy land and many parks and pavilions. The family-friendly community features an 18-hole Jack Nicklaus signature golf course and private access to Lake Keowee.

SCS manages the HOA boards of nearly 180 communities across the Carolinas, from multi-tiered master-planned communities to small, single family neighborhoods. Learn more about SCS and view staff bios at http://www.trustscs.com.

About Southern Community Services

Founded in 2000, Southern Community Services (SCS) specializes in the management of homeowner associations across the Carolinas, with a longstanding reputation as the leader in its industry. Staffed with accredited professionals who work diligently to accommodate the unique needs of each community, SCS provides turnkey solutions, state-of-the-art technology and decades of association management experience to boards, with senior-level involvement in every aspect of the business. Learn more about SCS at www.trustscs.com.

Southern Community Services Hails New Employees In Columbia, S.C.

Southern Community Services Hails New Employees in Columbia, S.C.

Southern Community Services Hails New Employees in Columbia, S.C.

Four new hires bring skill, know-how to the Midlands

Nov. 8, 2017 (Columbia, S.C.) – Southern Community Services (SCS), one of only six AAMC-accredited community association management firms in South Carolina, has hired four new employees in Columbia: Angela Adleman, Justin Lee, Taylor Woegens and Caprice M. Taylor.

“SCS prides itself on meeting the specific needs of each community we serve, and we look forward to the contributions our new employees will make in that effort,” says Ken Tamsin CEO of SCS.

HOA administrator Angela Adleman began her new role in July 2017.

Justin Lee, property manager at The Summit, managed healthcare for 10 years and was a Realtor in Douglas County, Colorado before he joined the SCS team.

Taylor Woegens, community assistant manager, holds a bachelor’s degree from William Paterson University of New Jersey. Now living in Columbia, she brings expertise and dedication to her new position.

Administrative assistant Caprice Taylor has a background in tax administration, customer service and inside sales. Hailing from Newberry, Taylor loves the South Carolina lifestyle and is excited to begin this position in Columbia.

SCS manages the homeowner association boards of nearly 180 communities across the Carolinas, from multi-tiered master-planned communities to small, single family neighborhoods. Learn more about SCS and view staff bios at http://www.trustscs.com.

About Southern Community Services

Founded in 2000, Southern Community Services (SCS) specializes in the management of homeowner associations across the Carolinas, with a longstanding reputation as the leader in its industry. Staffed with accredited professionals who work diligently to accommodate the unique needs of each community, SCS provides turnkey solutions, state-of-the-art technology and decades of association management experience to boards, with senior-level involvement in every aspect of the business. Learn more about SCS at www.trustscs.com.

 

Southern Community Services Welcomes New Management, Promotions  To Charleston Communities

Southern Community Services Welcomes New Management, Promotions to Charleston Communities

Southern Community Services Welcomes New Management, Promotions

to Charleston Communities

Employees bring experience, expertise to the Lowcountry

Nov. 8, 2017 (Charleston, S.C.) – Southern Community Services (SCS), one of only six AAMC-accredited community association management firms in South Carolina, has named eight new employees and one promotion in the Charleston area.

“Our new team members bring a great deal of experience from both within the real estate industry and outside of it,” says Ken Tamsin, CEO of SCS. “Our communities will benefit from their expertise, energy and new insights.”

Barbara Liantonio was hired as an architectural review board (ARB) coordinator and Lisa Tumminelli was hired as a community administrator for Dunes West, an upscale, mixed-development community in Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina. Liantonio has experience as an area manager for Dannon Yogurt and is a winner of nine Pinnacle Club awards. Tumminelli has experience as a corporate trainer, a help desk support staff member, a computer technician and a substitute teacher. Their combined experiences will bring new ideas and fresh perspectives to Dunes West.

Tess Gillis was hired as an administrative assistant at Park West, a family-friendly and nature-preserving community in Mt. Pleasant.

Nancy Curtis, community manager for Hamlin Plantation, has seven years of experience in the community management field.

Art Perry was named community manager at The Gardens at Tanner Plantation, a 144-single-family-home community in Hanahan, S.C. Perry was involved with the Eagle Scouts and is a member of the Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels.

Kelli Baker joins SCS as a community manager in the North Charleston office and brings knowledge from the hotel and hospitality industry to the team. Amanda Harper continues with SCS as a community association manager in her hometown of Mt. Pleasant.

Mary Fraser was promoted to assistant manager at I’On Assembly Inc. She is from Mt. Pleasant and was previously the office manager for SCS at Park West.

SCS manages the homeowner association boards of nearly 180 communities across the Carolinas, from multi-tiered master-planned communities to small, single-family neighborhoods. Learn more about SCS and view staff bios at http://www.trustscs.com.

About Southern Community Services

Founded in 2000, Southern Community Services (SCS) specializes in the management of homeowner associations across the Carolinas, with a longstanding reputation as the leader in its industry. Staffed with accredited professionals who work diligently to accommodate the unique needs of each community, SCS provides turnkey solutions, state-of-the-art technology and decades of association management experience to boards, with senior-level involvement in every aspect of the business. Learn more about SCS at www.trustscs.com.

Southern Community Services Acquires New Homeowner Association Management Client In The Upstate, S.C.

Southern Community Services Acquires New Homeowner Association Management Client in the Upstate, S.C.

Southern Community Services Acquires New Homeowner Association Management Client in the Upstate, S.C.

The Reserve at Lake Keowee joins the SCS client roster

Oct. 3, 2017 (Spartanburg/Greenville, S.C.) – Southern Community Services, one of only six AAMC-accredited community association management firms in South Carolina, has added The Reserve at Lake Keowee in Sunset, S.C., to its growing client list in the Upstate. A full client list can be found at http://www.TrustSCS.com.

Home to more than 700 families, The Reserve at Lake Keowee is the newest community acquired by SCS in the Upstate. Offering private access to Lake Keowee, one of the purest lakes in North America, The Reserve at Lake Keowee is edged by an 18-hole Jack Nicklaus Signature golf course and includes many hiking trails within its expansive 3,900 acres of preserved land, much of which is wildlife conservancy land dotted with parks and pavilions.

“We’re thrilled to add The Reserve at Lake Keowee to our client roster,” said Ken Tamsin, CEO of SCS. “It is a beautiful community in the vibrant and growing Upstate region­. It offers residents a scenic setting with engaging amenities, including tennis courts, pools, parks, golf, shopping and restaurants. More than 700 families have chosen to call The Reserve at Lake Keowee their home.”

The Reserve at Lake Keowee prides itself on being secluded, yet convenient; elegant, yet comfortable; private, yet community-minded. With 30 miles of shoreline, it is nestled only two hours from Atlanta, Charlotte and Columbia, S.C., and within easy reach of two vibrant, growing cities — Greenville, S.C., and Asheville, N.C. Just a 15-minute drive down the road, big-time sports and lifelong learning await at Clemson University.

SCS serves the HOA boards of nearly 180 communities across the Carolinas, from multi-tiered master-planned communities to small, single family neighborhoods and has offices in Spartanburg, S.C., Columbia, S.C. and the Charleston area. Details on the firm as well as secure, 24-7 online payment and document portals for homeowners can be found at http://www.TrustSCS.com.

About Southern Community Services

Founded in 2000, Southern Community Services (SCS) specializes in the management of homeowner associations across the Carolinas, with a longstanding reputation as the leader in its industry. Staffed with accredited professionals who work diligently to accommodate the unique needs of each community, SCS provides turnkey solutions, state-of-the-art technology and decades of association management experience to boards, with senior-level involvement in every aspect of the business. Learn more about SCS at www.TrustSCS.com.

LongCreek Plantation, Eagles Nest And Stratford Plantation Join SCS Client Docket

LongCreek Plantation, Eagles Nest and Stratford Plantation Join SCS Client Docket

Southern Community Services Expands Reach in Columbia, S.C. Area

LongCreek Plantation, Eagles Nest and Stratford Plantation join SCS client docket

Dec. 11, 2017 (Columbia, S.C.) – Southern Community Services (SCS), one of only six Accredited Association Management Company (AAMC)-accredited community association management firms in S.C., has added three new Columbia-area communities to its growing client list. LongCreek Plantation, Eagles Nest and Stratford Plantation join SCS’ client roster in the Midlands.

“The Midlands region is growing, and SCS is growing along with it,” said Ken Tamsin, CEO of SCS. “It’s a great feeling to welcome LongCreek Plantation, Eagles Nest and Stratford Plantation to our growing family.”

Just outside of Columbia, S.C., Blythewood’s LongCreek Plantation is a 1,500-unit development, which includes the gated, SCS-managed neighborhood of Windermere, as well as 14 other residential communities. Homes are located just minutes from major shopping areas and interstates, yet are nestled in quiet neighborhoods shaded by mature trees which create a “get-away-from-it-all” feel.

Eagles Nest is a single-family residential community in Chapin, S.C., established in 2008. The community includes a pool, a small clubhouse, a playground and a basketball court. Located conveniently near I-26, Eagles Nest is a short drive from Lake Murray, downtown Columbia and Irmo, S.C., as well as other great amenities the area has to offer.

Stratford Plantation, located in Elgin, S.C. in the heart of the Palmetto State, is a beautiful neighborhood featuring large wooded lots and two ponds.

Southern Community Services serves the homeowner association (HOA) boards of over 180 communities across the Carolinas, from multi-tiered, master-planned communities to small, single-family neighborhoods, with offices in Spartanburg, S.C., Columbia, S.C. and the Charleston area. Details on the firm as well as secure, 24-7 online payment and document portals for homeowners can be found at http://trustscs.com.

About Southern Community Services

Founded in 2000, Southern Community Services (SCS) specializes in the management of homeowner associations across the Carolinas, with a longstanding reputation as the leader in its industry. Staffed with accredited professionals who work diligently to accommodate the unique needs of each community, SCS provides turnkey solutions, state-of-the-art technology and decades of association management experience to boards, with senior-level involvement in every aspect of the business. Learn more about SCS at www.TrustSCS.com.

Rivertowne On The Wando Community Joins SCS’ Growing Client Roster

Rivertowne on the Wando Community Joins SCS’ Growing Client Roster

 Southern Community Services Expands in the Lowcountry

 Rivertowne on the Wando community joins SCS’ growing client roster

Dec. 11, 2017 (Charleston, S.C.) – Southern Community Services (SCS), one of only six Accredited Association Management Company (AAMC)-accredited community association management firms in South Carolina, recently acquired the Mt. Pleasant community Rivertowne on the Wando.

“We are excited to expand in the Lowcountry and to work with such a friendly, beautiful community,” says Jessica Turner, SCS Vice President of the Charleston Region. “The Charleston community is ever-expanding and SCS’ growth runs parallel with it.”

Sue Shunk was named the community manager for the Rivertowne on the Wando community. Shunk will assist the homeowner association (HOA) board with billing and collections, newsletter services, architectural review, financial reporting and accounting, budget preparation, property maintenance, event planning and more.

Rivertowne on the Wando is a single-family community that sits along the bank of the Wando River. The community is made up of 460 homes and home sites along with an abundance of amenities, all of which work together to create a friendly social atmosphere for families and neighbors.

Southern Community Services serves the homeowner association (HOA) boards of over 180 communities across the Carolinas, from multi-tiered, master-planned communities to small, single-family neighborhoods, with offices in Spartanburg, S.C., Columbia, S.C. and the Charleston area. Details on the firm as well as secure, 24-7 online payment and document portals for homeowners can be found at http://trustscs.com/

About Southern Community Services

Founded in 2000, Southern Community Services (SCS) specializes in the management of homeowner associations across the Carolinas, with a longstanding reputation as the leader in its industry. Staffed with accredited professionals who work diligently to accommodate the unique needs of each community, SCS provides turnkey solutions, state-of-the-art technology and decades of association management experience to boards, with senior-level involvement in every aspect of the business. Learn more about SCS at www.trustscs.com.

SCS Will Host Two CAI-SC Events This Spring

SCS will Host Two CAI-SC Events this Spring

Southern Community Services is hosting two Community Associations Institute (CAI-SC) Lunch and Learn events in spring 2018. Join us!

Register online online at www.cai-sc.org or info@brainerdcommunications.com. 

Stay tuned for more details on speakers and session topics!


April 26, 2018: Columbia

Southern Community Services
King’s Grant Clubhouse
300 North Kings Grant
Columbia, SC 20209
Capacity: 50

May 3, 2018: Charleston

Southern Community Services
Park West Clubhouse
2701-P1 Park West Blvd
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29466
Capacity: 50-75

Q & A With HOA Expert

Q & A with HOA Expert

Q: I am having trouble contacting the individual directors on the board of directors. The HOA president says there are “privacy issues” to giving out phone numbers or email addresses. I’ve asked our property manager and I get the same response. I thought that as a homeowner I have a right to directly contact my board members.

A: All members, including board members, have the right to privacy. Your board has hired a management company to handle business. The manager, in turn, contacts the board as needed when business matters exceed the manager’s authority. I suggest you contact the manager with your request. Either he will be able to help you or will ask the board president or board for direction. This is a reasonable process to protect board member privacy.

Q: Does an Architectural Review Committee (ARC) have the right to ignore published regulations relating to the installation of playground equipment on a residential lot? Our Rules and Regulations specifies that before an application is approved, the owners of adjacent properties must be notified.

A: If the ARC has a procedure to follow and it has not been followed, you have the right to appeal the matter to the board of directors. The requirement for neighbor input was put there for a reason and should be honored as long as it exists.

Q: Can owners and board members be prohibited from conferring with the HOA’s lawyer by the board president who is the appointed liaison?

A: Since conferring with an attorney triggers cost to the HOA, the board should have a strict policy concerning how and when it is done and who has authority to do so. This policy should be communicated to the attorney in writing so he knows who he authorized to deal with.

 

Used with permission from Richard Thompson of www.Regenesis.net. From Regenesis Aug. 2017 newsletter. 

Like A River

Like a River

Last night I went paddling and was reminded yet again why I love rivers so much. Wild or quiet, no river is ever the same from day to day, season to season.

Water transforms the world. To enter the water is to enter another universe. The river takes the solid world we walk around in every day and shape-shifts it into another reality, a fluid reality of change and flow.

Flowing water is time itself unfolding. There is no other place where it’s possible to experience so vividly how time moves into the future as on a river. It is not the inexorable march of seconds, each the same as the next, or the hands of a watch ticking away. On a river, time moves because the world flows, now accelerating and then slowing, eddying and swirling to push and tumble ahead, never the same but always downward and onward.

The river is a constant reminder that we are capable of continual evolution, that every shape is only temporary, that time is always moving, that the world is constantly creating itself anew.

Science suggests that all elements heavier than hydrogen and helium have been through the life of at least one star. The oxygen and iron in our blood, the carbon that is the backbone of our metabolism and life tissue, the potassium and sodium that allow us thought and action, they all have an ancient pedigree billions of years old, born of stellar explosions, of planets dying and being reborn, of life beginning and evolving.

Everything within us has gone through this most epic journey. And through it all, a true miracle, that somehow we are given self-awareness. Over time, everything with us flows like water. Our very being is as transient as the surface of a river.

The river speaks all this and much more. It speaks of time and the currents of the world, of shaping canyons and cutting through continents. Of this instant and eternity. “We are made of dust, and the light of a star.”

From an article by Doug Ammons.

Used with permission from Richard Thompson of www.Regenesis.net. From Regenesis Aug. 2017 newsletter. 

Hi Yo Silver!

Hi Yo Silver!

Being a person that wants to serve and protect your own interests, you get yourself elected to the board. At the first board meeting, the president gives you a pep talk about not giving instructions to contractors or discussing board issues with other members unless you preface comments with “the board policy/decision is…”. You bristle at this. Who does this guy think he is? This is America, Home of the Free and Land of the Lone Ranger. Why shouldn’t you be able to say what you want, when you want and to whoever you want?

As a director on the board, you wear two hats: one as an elected official and another as a member of the HOA. While you are clearly entitled to your personal opinion, you need to be careful how and when you express your opinion as a board member. Once elected to serve the interests of the HOA, you need to view things through corporate glasses. This can be difficult when the issues are contentious.

The homeowner association form of government is a representative democracy…a few are elected to represent the many. A fundamental concept of democracy is rule by the majority. Thus, decisions of the board do not require consensus, just that most agree. This may leave some directors in the minority opinion and in even direct opposition with the rest.

When it comes to being a minority position director, there are several approaches, one good and one bad. An HOA board needs diverse points of view to make good decisions. If few have an opinion, usually the loudest voice will prevail and effectively the board will run by a dictator. Dictators don’t work well within the democratic context. Having dissenting opinions expands the perspective and dissenters can often have a major impact on shaping key parts of the final decision. A Lone Ranger dissenter may not carry the day but can still impact the outcome.

On the other hand, a dissenter can choose to express opposition by churning the board’s decision through the HOA grist mill, spinning the facts and creating ill will. It compromises the ability of the board to do its job and causes bad feelings among neighbors. That’s bad for everyone.

That said, there are times when a board or board officer is acting irresponsibly or even criminally. Whistle blowing is certainly appropriate when there is self dealing going on. If the matter is irresponsibility or neglecting HOA business, a vigilant director can be effective by promoting candidates that are more suitable or encourage ineffective directors to step down. But bad mouthing the current regime to neighbors over the back fence is usually self-defeating. It makes the Long Ranger look small minded, he will be ostracized or minimized by the remaining directors and lose ability to impact decisions.

A Lone Ranger director can also compromise the HOA’s interests by interfering with day to day management. One of the most frustrating things a contractor goes through is trying to respond to many “chiefs”. In a professionally managed HOA, the manager is usually authorized to direct contractors. But when a Lone Ranger director steps in to micro-manage a project, the contractor will often try to respond to both the manager and Lone Ranger. But it takes more time and effort and reduces the chances of a successful outcome.

Tonto was the Lone Ranger’s sidekick and mentor. With his wise manner, he would balance the Ranger’s hero compulsivity. Between the two and creative thinking, they always figured out a way to save the day.

In the final analysis, while dissent is a fundamental part of the democratic process and can produce good outcomes, consistently being a Long Ranger erodes the ability for the board to work as a team. Tonto understood the concept of teamwork and often gave the Ranger a different point of view by providing additional information and options. Encourage opposing points of view but strive to forge an outcome that works for the majority. Hi yo Silver!

Used with permission from Richard Thompson of www.Regenesis.net. From Regenesis Aug. 2017 newsletter.